Mahler & Beethoven (Downtown)

Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 4, composed between 1899 and 1901, is a four-movement work that is notable for its lighter, more accessible character compared to his earlier symphonies. It incorporates a rich tapestry of orchestral colors and features a distinctive blend of innocence and irony. The symphony culminates in a serene and childlike fourth movement, where a soprano soloist sings “Das himmlische Leben” (“The Heavenly Life”), a song that envisions a child’s view of paradise, set to text from the collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn. This movement reflects Mahler’s fascination with themes of childhood and the afterlife, offering a vision of celestial bliss with a subtly complex orchestral accompaniment.

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67, composed between 1804 and 1808, is one of the most famous and frequently performed symphonies in classical music. Renowned for its iconic four-note motif—often described as “fate knocking at the door”—which opens the first movement, the symphony is a journey from darkness to light, embodying struggle and triumph. The work’s four movements transition from the intense and dramatic opening through a lyrical second movement, a vigorous scherzo, and a triumphant final movement, which celebrates victory with an exhilarating shift to C major. This symphony, marked by its structural cohesion and emotional depth, epitomizes Beethoven’s ability to convey profound ideas through music.

Brahms & Beethoven (Downtown)

Join us for a thrilling evening of classical music from the Romantic era, featuring Brahms Symphony No. 1 and Beethoven Symphony No.7. Composed in 1812, during a difficult period in Beethoven’s life, No. 7 holds a special place in the classical repertoire due to its exhilarating energy, and emotional depth. One of its distinctive features is its rhythmic drive, evident in the famous second movement, Allegretto.

Brahms No. 1 premiered in 1876, marking his debut as a symphonic composer. The symphony famously took 14 years to compose, as Brahms struggled under the burden of being seen as Beethoven’s musical heir. He deeply admired Beethoven’s music and sought to carry on his legacy while also carving out his own path as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. ​

Mandle Philharmonic is the initiative of Mandle Cheung. The self-taught conductor, leading an orchestra of world-class musicians, has created an upstart ensemble that forges a new space in orchestral music.

Brahms & Beethoven (North York)

Join us for a thrilling evening of classical music from the Romantic era, featuring Brahms Symphony No. 1 and Beethoven Symphony No.7. Composed in 1812, during a difficult period in Beethoven’s life, No. 7 holds a special place in the classical repertoire due to its exhilarating energy, and emotional depth. One of its distinctive features is its rhythmic drive, evident in the famous second movement, Allegretto.

Brahms No. 1 premiered in 1876, marking his debut as a symphonic composer. The symphony famously took 14 years to compose, as Brahms struggled under the burden of being seen as Beethoven’s musical heir. He deeply admired Beethoven’s music and sought to carry on his legacy while also carving out his own path as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. ​

Mandle Philharmonic is the initiative of Mandle Cheung. The self-taught conductor, leading an orchestra of world-class musicians, has created an upstart ensemble that forges a new space in orchestral music.

Beethoven 9

Beethoven’s ‘Choral’ is arguably the greatest symphony ever composed: the summit of his achievements, a masterful musical celebration of the human race and a massive work that makes all who hear it feel better about life.

For almost 200 years, the famous hymnal theme to this symphony’s finale – the ‘Ode to Joy’ – has symbolised hope, unity and fellowship – across borders and through conflicts. .

Yet, Beethoven himself never actually heard it The man who had done more than anyone before him to change the way we hear music had become one for whom sounds could no longer exist – and the bitter irony of this was not lost on him.

Despite his deteriorating hearing, though, Beethoven persevered with writing this mammoth symphony. Encouraged, no doubt, by his status as the composer of the moment, he penned a colossal work.

But, when Beethoven conducted its premiere, he was famously unaware of the rapturous response his ninth symphony received. It took one of the musicians to alert him to the cheering audience – and that was only at the end of the second movement.

The program will also feature performances of Alexander Borodin’s Polovetsian Dance, and Carmina Burana by Carl Orff.

Beethoven 9

Beethoven’s ‘Choral’ is arguably the greatest symphony ever composed: the summit of his achievements, a masterful musical celebration of the human race and a massive work that makes all who hear it feel better about life.

For almost 200 years, the famous hymnal theme to this symphony’s finale – the ‘Ode to Joy’ – has symbolised hope, unity and fellowship – across borders and through conflicts. .

Yet, Beethoven himself never actually heard it The man who had done more than anyone before him to change the way we hear music had become one for whom sounds could no longer exist – and the bitter irony of this was not lost on him.

Despite his deteriorating hearing, though, Beethoven persevered with writing this mammoth symphony. Encouraged, no doubt, by his status as the composer of the moment, he penned a colossal work.

But, when Beethoven conducted its premiere, he was famously unaware of the rapturous response his ninth symphony received. It took one of the musicians to alert him to the cheering audience – and that was only at the end of the second movement.

The program will also feature performances of Alexander Borodin’s Polovetsian Dance, and Carmina Burana by Carl Orff.

Pops Concert Featuring Star Wars

Join us for a thrilling evening of classical music as we bring the iconic and beloved theme of  Star Wars (John Williams) to life! Alongside the unforgettable melodies from a galaxy far, far away, our talented orchestra will perform Bizet’s passionate Carmen, the stirring Polovtsian Dances, captivating Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah, the lively Hungarian Rhapsody, and works by Mussgorsky (Night on Bald Mountain), Dvořák (Slavonic Dances Op 46 /8) and Smetana( Ma Vlast: Moldau).

Each piece will take you on a journey through different eras and cultures, showcasing the incredible diversity and power of classical music. This is an event not to be missed – book your tickets now and prepare to be swept away by the magic of classical music! 

Program

  •  John Williams, Star Wars Suite (First Movement)
  • Georges Bizet, Carmen Suite No. 1 and No. 2
  • Alexander Borodin, Polovtsian Dances
  • Antonin Dvořák, Slavonic Dances Op 46 /8
  • Franz Liszt, Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
  • Modest Mussorgsky, Night on Bald Mountain
  • Camille Saint-Saëns, Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah
  • Bedrich Smetana, Ma Vlast: Moldau

Tickets: Start at $40

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